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Michael Schumacher LATEST: F1 star’s legacy LIVES ON – nephew steps up in fitting tribute

F4 handout Michael Schumacher’s nephew David has gone into the family trade of racing driving But today as the racing legend battles with health woes, his legacy lives on through his family, as his nephew, David, 16, became the fourth member of the clan to go into professional racing. This year, David drove in Formula Four of the United Arab Emirates ace, the “Formula 4 UAE”.  The F1 legend’s nephew is now preparing for a possible start in the German Formula Four. The Schumachers clearly have racing in their blood,…

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Lifestyle 

Favourite songs will help you beat dementia: Old tunes can revive lost memories

Doctors believe we retain the clearest memories for songs we enjoyed between the ages of 10 and 30.  The effects are thought to be so profound that British researchers have set up a task force to explore the role music can play in mitigating dementia’s devastating effects.  They want people to learn to play instruments to help prevent the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer’s and have called for music-based therapies to be officially adopted.  Baroness Sally Greengross, chief executive of the International Longevity Centre, which has set up a…

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Science 

Some people identify smells as easily as if they were colours

A Semelai speaker sampling one of the odoursNicole Kruspe By Andy Coghlan Name that smell! Most of us can’t name very many, but it seems hunter-gatherers are better at it than anyone else on the planet. It could be that, to survive in dark tropical forests, they have become adept at sniffing out fruit, prey, predators and each other – and have honed their vocabularies to suit. By contrast, while westerners can discriminate between over a trillion smells, they have developed few words to describe them consistently. Most English-speakers knows…

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Science 

The higher your testosterone levels, the more you love soft rock

Could testosterone explain a love of Bryan Adams?Martyn Goodacre/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou Miles Davis or Mariah Carey? Your choice of music genre might be influenced by the amount of testosterone coursing through your body. Levels of this sex hormone have been linked to music taste, providing the first evidence that musical preference has a biological basis. Most research into music tastes has focussed on the role of an individual’s personality, says Hirokazu Doi, of Nagasaki University, Japan. “Extroverted people tend to like pop music, for example,” he says. But could…

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Science 

What happens when you die?

GETTY Bodies decompose quickly unless they are embalmed Do we live on after death? If so, where? Is there a heaven? What is heaven like? What happens to my body? What happens to my soul? They are the greatest of all of life’s imponderables which have been tackled, with varying degrees of success by science, art and religion. Here we look at the latest thinking in all these areas… What happens to your body after you die? Medically speaking, death happens in two stages. The first, clinical death, lasts for…

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Space 

Getting the cloud above the clouds (and surviving a dry spell)

This article originally appeared in the Dec. 4, 2017 issue of SpaceNews magazine. Sending data to and from different spots on Earth is big business for satellite operators, but Cloud Constellation sees a lucrative opportunity to offer satellites as the ultimate cloud storage solution for sensitive data. The Los Angeles-based startup, now approaching the third anniversary of its founding, has a way to go to fulfill that dream. In September, Cloud Constellation signed a launch agreement with Virgin Orbit for 12 LauncherOne missions, and has a memorandum of understanding with…

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Science 

Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventable

More than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain’s ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treatment with an arthritis drug, the animals’ ability to learn and remember remained sharp after West Nile disease.

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Science 

A ‘touching sight’: How babies’ brains process touch builds foundations for learning

A new study provides one of the first looks inside the infant’s brain to show where the sense of touch is processed — not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult’s hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy.

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Science 

Johann Hari doesn’t know depression’s real causes – no one does

Depression is different for everyoneChristopher Furlong/Getty By Samantha Murphy Is it possible for a writer whose credibility has been questioned in the past to deliver a credible message now? This is the query at the heart of deep division over Johann Hari’s new book, Lost Connections: Uncovering the real causes of depression – and the unexpected solutions. In it, Hari, who apologised over plagiarism claims in 2011, relies heavily on personal and anecdotal experience to relay stories from across the globe about things that can stand as alternatives to antidepressant medications,…

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